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diademuerto8:

Greenville, SC 2: 

I got more of the Reedy River, its many bridges, and spied on some ducks from above. 

diademuerto8:

Greenville, SC

Some shots of the Reedy River that runs through the heart of downtown. One waterfall a bit farther up is man made, but not many cities in the world can say they have a natural waterfall as part of their scenery. 

A Day in Beaufort

tripsandtrends:

Beaufort, South Carolina is a small town that has a big amount of Southern charm. I swear, the longer I stay here, the more and more I recognise it’s true “lowcountry” beauty. I love everything from the beautiful historical homes to the stunning sunsets across the marsh. Like I said last week in…

mapsontheweb:

In each of South Carolina’s congressional districts, what percentage of the population isn’t white?

mapsontheweb:

In each of South Carolina’s congressional districts, what percentage of the population isn’t white?

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

melzwhimzy:

thanks readitsomeplace 

beautifulbarns:

Crestview Farm | Cooper Home & Stable

Polo facility in Aiken, SC

wellistandcorrected:

Is this real life?

wellistandcorrected:

Is this real life?

mrbevill:

A couple of pages from a children’s book I finished over the summer for the University of South Carolina.  Their capitol was a lot of fun to draw.

southcarolinadove:

August 16th 1780, Battle of CamdenEarly in the dawn hours of 16 August 1780, Colonel Otho H. Williams, surveying the American line, noticed the British advancing up the road. He consulted Captain Singleton of the artillery and it was determined that the British could be no more than 200 yards off. Williams gave the order for an artillery barrage and the British quickly unlimbered their guns and replied. The Battle of Camden had begun in earnest.Stevens, on the left, was ordered to move the Virginians forward and the inexperienced and seldom reliable militia responded with hesitation. Williams called for volunteers, led 80 or 90 troops to within 40 yards of the deploying British, and delivered a harassing fire from behind trees. Lord Cornwallis, positioned near the action and always alert, had noticed the Virginians’ hesitation and ordered Webster to advance on the right. In what was one of the worst mismatches in military history, two of the best regiments to ever serve in the British Army, the 33rd Regiment and the 23rd Regiment, with the best trained light infantry in the world, came up against untrained and unreliable troops on the American left. Seeing the perfectly formed line sweep toward them with a mighty cheer then terrible silence, save the clanking of cold steel bayonet on musket barrel, the Virginians broke and ran. A few managed to get off a few shots and several of the British troops went down. However, the pell-mell panic quickly spread to the North Carolina militia near the road and soon the militia broke through the Maryland Continentals, stationed in reserve, and threw that normally-reliable troop into disarray.Seeing the wholesale panic of his entire left wing, Major General Horatio Gates mounted a swift horse and took to the road with his militia, leaving the battle to be decided by his more brave and capable officers. Incidentally, Gates covered sixty miles in just a few short hours! Although the Congress later exonerated him for his misconduct and cowardice, Gates never held a field command again.Baron Johann de Kalb and General Mordecai Gist, on the American right wing, and the Maryland Continentals were still in the field. One regiment of North Carolina militia did not take part in the flight and fell back into the fighting alongside the Delaware Continentals. Williams and de Kalb tried to bring Smallwood’s reserve to the left of the 2nd Brigade to form an “L.” However, Smallwood had fled the battle and the troop was without leadership. In the meantime, Cornwallis had advanced strong troops into the gap and between the two brigades. At this point Lord Cornwallis sent Colonel James Webster and his veteran troops against the First Maryland troops. Much to the credit of the Americans, they stood fast and went toe-to-toe with the best regiments in the world for quite some time. However, after several breaks and rallies, they were forced from the field and into the swamps. Most of the Maryland troops, because of the inability of Colonel Banastre Tarleton’s horse to pursue in the terrain, escaped to fight another day.Only the Second Maryland Brigade, the Delaware Continentals, and Dixon’s North Carolina militia continued the battle. At this point, it was some 600 men against 2,000. They had managed to check Lord Rawdon’s left and had even taken a few prisoners. It should be noted here that in one of those strange battlefield occurrences, the American’s most experienced Continentals were facing the British army’s most inexperienced troops, the Royal NC Regiment. Baron Johann de Kalb personally led bayonet charge after bayonet charge for over an hour. His horse had been shot out from under him and he had suffered a saber cut to the head. In a final assault he killed a British soldier and then went down to bayonet wounds and bullet wounds. His troops closed around him and opposed yet another bayonet charge from the British.However, at this point, Colonel Tarleton returned with his horsemen from the pursuit of the fleeing militias and Cornwallis threw his horse troops on the American rear. The remaining American troops stood for a few minutes and fought the onslaught from all sides but finally broke and ran. The Battle of Camden was complete.
From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page

southcarolinadove:

August 16th 1780, Battle of Camden
Early in the dawn hours of 16 August 1780, Colonel Otho H. Williams, surveying the American line, noticed the British advancing up the road. He consulted Captain Singleton of the artillery and it was determined that the British could be no more than 200 yards off. Williams gave the order for an artillery barrage and the British quickly unlimbered their guns and replied. The Battle of Camden had begun in earnest.
Stevens, on the left, was ordered to move the Virginians forward and the inexperienced and seldom reliable militia responded with hesitation. Williams called for volunteers, led 80 or 90 troops to within 40 yards of the deploying British, and delivered a harassing fire from behind trees. Lord Cornwallis, positioned near the action and always alert, had noticed the Virginians’ hesitation and ordered Webster to advance on the right. In what was one of the worst mismatches in military history, two of the best regiments to ever serve in the British Army, the 33rd Regiment and the 23rd Regiment, with the best trained light infantry in the world, came up against untrained and unreliable troops on the American left. Seeing the perfectly formed line sweep toward them with a mighty cheer then terrible silence, save the clanking of cold steel bayonet on musket barrel, the Virginians broke and ran. A few managed to get off a few shots and several of the British troops went down. However, the pell-mell panic quickly spread to the North Carolina militia near the road and soon the militia broke through the Maryland Continentals, stationed in reserve, and threw that normally-reliable troop into disarray.
Seeing the wholesale panic of his entire left wing, Major General Horatio Gates mounted a swift horse and took to the road with his militia, leaving the battle to be decided by his more brave and capable officers. Incidentally, Gates covered sixty miles in just a few short hours! Although the Congress later exonerated him for his misconduct and cowardice, Gates never held a field command again.
Baron Johann de Kalb and General Mordecai Gist, on the American right wing, and the Maryland Continentals were still in the field. One regiment of North Carolina militia did not take part in the flight and fell back into the fighting alongside the Delaware Continentals. Williams and de Kalb tried to bring Smallwood’s reserve to the left of the 2nd Brigade to form an “L.” However, Smallwood had fled the battle and the troop was without leadership. In the meantime, Cornwallis had advanced strong troops into the gap and between the two brigades. At this point Lord Cornwallis sent Colonel James Webster and his veteran troops against the First Maryland troops. Much to the credit of the Americans, they stood fast and went toe-to-toe with the best regiments in the world for quite some time. However, after several breaks and rallies, they were forced from the field and into the swamps. Most of the Maryland troops, because of the inability of Colonel Banastre Tarleton’s horse to pursue in the terrain, escaped to fight another day.
Only the Second Maryland Brigade, the Delaware Continentals, and Dixon’s North Carolina militia continued the battle. At this point, it was some 600 men against 2,000. They had managed to check Lord Rawdon’s left and had even taken a few prisoners. It should be noted here that in one of those strange battlefield occurrences, the American’s most experienced Continentals were facing the British army’s most inexperienced troops, the Royal NC Regiment. Baron Johann de Kalb personally led bayonet charge after bayonet charge for over an hour. His horse had been shot out from under him and he had suffered a saber cut to the head. In a final assault he killed a British soldier and then went down to bayonet wounds and bullet wounds. His troops closed around him and opposed yet another bayonet charge from the British.
However, at this point, Colonel Tarleton returned with his horsemen from the pursuit of the fleeing militias and Cornwallis threw his horse troops on the American rear. The remaining American troops stood for a few minutes and fought the onslaught from all sides but finally broke and ran. The Battle of Camden was complete.

From the Palmetto Patriots, Settlers, Natives and Heroes Facebook page